The Pollution Footprint, 2

Campaign
Agency Network: 
Published/Aired: 
July 2018
Greenpeace: The Pollution Footprint, 2

Description

Our seas harbor more and more plastic than life, the jungle is bled by mining and illegal logging, the fuel of the cars suffocate our cities. The question is: is this our legacy? We believe that no and for this reason we create this campaign for Greenpeace, because there may still be a better future as long as we take action today.

Print advertisement created by Lion's Heart, Peru for Greenpeace, within the category: Public Interest, NGO.

Advertising Agency: Lion's Heart, Lima, Peru
Art Directors: Luis Leon, Rodrigo Quiñones
Copywriter: Luis Leon
Illustrator: Manuel Abad
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Teal Trinity's picture

The image is arresting and beautiful... which is exactly why it fails to deliver the intended message. The damage being done within and beneath the swirls is too narrow to make out clearly. Therefore the eyes are drawn instead to the gorgeous foliage.

There is also a major problem with the ratio of green vs. "footprint." At first glance, I fully expected this to be an ad for luxury travel to a remote and exotic location. With such a large portion of the image covered in what appears to be pristine forest, it's almost impossible to see this as a call to action.

Rather, it mollifies the viewer into thinking, "hey, look how everything surrounding it is just fine... obviously, things can't be THAT bad." Conscience thus placated with what the eyes see (rather than what the brain knows), one can move on, wholly unaffected.

The image of the footprint over the city is far more effective. The tragically mistreated land covers the poster, yet leaves just enough small areas intact. Viewers can easily and instantly extrapolate how beautiful it must have once been, as well as how the current state is so unnecessary and ultimately - hopefully - reparable.

THAT creates a call to action within the emotions: the sense that if we each begin to take even small steps and make basic changes, places like this could be prevented and someday reborn. This message will prompt many who see it to start using the recycling bin sitting in the garage, and to insist on paper bags or begin carrying cloth totes.

Teal Trinity
Activity Score 4
Teal Trinity's picture

The image is arresting and beautiful... which is exactly why it fails to deliver the intended message. The damage being done within and beneath the swirls is too narrow to make out clearly. Therefore the eyes are drawn instead to the gorgeous foliage.

There is also a major problem with the ratio of green vs. "footprint." At first glance, I fully expected this to be an ad for luxury travel to a remote and exotic location. With such a large portion of the image covered in what appears to be pristine forest, it's almost impossible to see this as a call to action.

Rather, it mollifies the viewer into thinking, "hey, look how everything surrounding it is just fine... obviously, things can't be THAT bad." Conscience thus placated with what the eyes see (rather than what the brain knows), one can move on, wholly unaffected.

The image of the footprint over the city is far more effective. The tragically mistreated land covers the poster, yet leaves just enough small areas intact. Viewers can easily and instantly extrapolate how beautiful it must have once been, as well as how the current state is so unnecessary and ultimately - hopefully - reparable.

THAT creates a call to action within the emotions: the sense that if we each begin to take even small steps and make basic changes, places like this could be prevented and someday reborn. This message will prompt many who see it to start using the recycling bin sitting in the garage, and to insist on paper bags or begin carrying cloth totes.

Teal Trinity
Activity Score 4
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