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Puppy

Campaign
Agency Network: 
Published/Aired: 
January 2011

Also From This Campaign 3

Description

Film advertisement created by Fueld, United States for TicketCity, within the category: Professional Services.

Advertising Agency / Production Company: Fueld Films, USA
Directors: Ben Hurst, Dave Thomas
Producer: Summer Finley
Executive Producer: Brady Anderton
DP: Ben Hurst
Copywriter: Dave Thomas
Post production: Austen Menges / Fueld
Color: Brandon Thomas
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CuriousPencil's picture

Nope.

"Tickets are not currently available. Please enter your email address to join our mailing list* and receive updates on Arizona Cardinals Tickets"

Doesn't sound like an animal lover to me. Sounds like a piece of code in an automated website.

CuriousPencil
Activity Score 4225
Copywriter
junior.thomas's picture

Go here:

http://www.ticketcity.com/helpful-links/our-team.html

and pick a sales person. Call up their direct phone number and talk to them about the tickets you want. Posting direct access to real people on their website is pretty unusual, don't you think?

(It'd also be nice if you'd rate the commercial, not the results of your half-hearted attempt at using the service. But that's your call.)

junior.thomas
Activity Score 27
CuriousPencil's picture

For me to rate a commercial I have to see how effective it is, how truthful, how communicative. I watched this spot and went to the website - it would be a bit naive of me not to - and clicked on the same place the guy in the spot did, which turned out to be 'Champion Event Tickets'.

The first one on the list is for the SuperBowl. I click it. It gives me a review. And lists of more links. And I'm lost in the maze of automated ticket websites that I was assured this was not.

I'm - honestly - not being troublesome for the sake of it.

So I've gone through 6 automated screens, and took it up to the final 'click to buy' for my $5,000 ticket. Without any contact from this 'real person [who likes animals]'

And no doubt could continue and complete the process smoothly without contact with a person. That's the joy of automated ticket websites. That's why they're so good. Because they don't normally need people, unless I'm my mother and need some handholding. In which case a contact person would be fantastic.

So I go back and start again. NOT IN ANY SINGLE LINK that I can see is there an opportunity to contact a real person. Nowhere. Yes, you've provided the link to the team. That is laudable. In fact, that's what the entire campaign is based on. Did anyone tell the website? Because that seems to be from a different company.

So then I look at the way I rated the commercial. And I can't change the rating until your client changes the website. And if they don't, then your campaign is misleading and you've done a bad job. Saying something is all about the human contact and then hiding the human contact -- not good, sorry.

CuriousPencil
Activity Score 4225
Copywriter
junior.thomas's picture

The website doesn't claim to NOT be a website. (Yes, there are an awful lot of links n stuff.) It just promises that a real human is there for you, should you need one. Like you, I wish that access was more direct and obvious on the website (you make a very good point there—one that we've also made to our client), but I can't agree that it's not there, or that the claims are misleading.

Having said all that, I honestly appreciate your good faith efforts in checking it out, and your feedback. Cheers.

junior.thomas
Activity Score 27
CuriousPencil's picture

>When you buy tickets at TicketCity you're being helped by a real human being<. (cut to cute woman)
>What's behind *other* ticketing websites?< (cut to mess of wires)
>Your ticketcity representative can guide you to the best seats, let you know when your tickets are coming. And show affection to animals. As for those other websites. It's like they're not even trying<

Now, tell me where it says here "that a real human is there for you, *should you need one*"?

And tell me how the claim "you're being helped by a real human being" isn't misleading when you can't actually find one, and that there is no obvious link to one.

CuriousPencil
Activity Score 4225
Copywriter
CuriousPencil's picture

And just to point out one common pitfall that might be helpful. I've just had an email from ticketcity about my account, with details of what I can change, how I can use the website and the like. And in the list of benefits to expect, not ONCE was there anything about human contact. It was signed off 'the ticketcity team', fine, that's universal.

Now, you said that you had pointed these things out to your client.

Does this mean - maybe - that you made an entire campaign based on the client you THOUGHT they were? Because it sure looks that way to me. I think this campaign might end up on the curricula of marketing schools in the not-too-distant future. And not for the good reason.

CuriousPencil
Activity Score 4225
Copywriter
junior.thomas's picture

If you don't mind, I'd love to pass your thoughts and experience on to the company. All very relevant feedback.

I don't feel your assessments invalidate the spots or the soundness of the strategy, but that's just the way opinions work.

junior.thomas
Activity Score 27
CuriousPencil's picture

I would absolutely be delighted. And would love to hear from other people involved. There may be something glaringly obvious in the campaign that I've missed in my cursory glance...

CuriousPencil
Activity Score 4225
Copywriter
CuriousPencil's picture

But purely to take the spot on its merits: it's an attack ad. It compares itself to other websites that are fully automated. It highlights the frailty of human operators. It says 'you'll speak to a person, and all our people are great. We all love animals, help the frail...' and quietly doesn't say 'we get ill, we have bad days, we can be rude, we're a human server farm, we'll f*ck up where machines won't." Basically this is a Luddite advert, or could be, saying "don't trust the Machine, trust the flesh" but fails pretty instantly when the client turns out to be a website, and the call to action is to visit a website, whose USP IS SUPPOSEDLY PEOPLE AND THERE ISN'T A SINGLE F*CKING FACE TO BE SEEN.

So, again, I'll have to keep my rating of the campaign - on its own grounds, within the context it sets itself - where it is.

CuriousPencil
Activity Score 4225
Copywriter
junior.thomas's picture

You're fully entitled to your rating.

Just to reiterate once more: the claim is NOT that there isn't a website, any more than the claim is that our humans are perfect. The claim is that it IS a website, and that if you ever tire of the website you will have access to a human. Which you do, even if it's harder to find that we all might prefer. So, yeah, we're not gonna agree here.

p.s. If this is your idea of an attack, then I'd love to meet you in a dark alley. (Ha, kidding.)

junior.thomas
Activity Score 27
CuriousPencil's picture

"The claim is that it IS a website, and that if you ever tire of the website you will have access to a human"

No. The claim, in the first words of the commercial you helped create is: "When you buy tickets at ticketcity you're being helped by a real human being."

Nothing there about being tired of the website. Nothing there about having access to a human. The entire foundation of the campaign is that you're being helped, and the implication is that it's automatically human.

p.s. I try not to attack large, slow moving targets.

CuriousPencil
Activity Score 4225
Copywriter
junior.thomas's picture

We show the dude on the website. We're not claiming it's not a website. We just claim that there are people behind the website that can help you, if you want. It's two clicks from the homepage—maybe that's two clicks too many, but it doesn't mean they don't exist.

You seem to think that the claim is that every single function you experience on the website is being performed by human beings, pulling on magic internet levers or stoking the internet steam engines that power the site. I find that conclusion unreasonable, but I guess I don't need to say that anymore.

junior.thomas
Activity Score 27
CuriousPencil's picture

It's not an unreasonable conclusion. A guy makes ONE CLICK and the doors spring back. Come ON. Don't flip it back on me for being a pedant here.

CuriousPencil
Activity Score 4225
Copywriter
junior.thomas's picture

I guess I don't get what you actually expected, rather than people's faces on the homepage. If that's all, then fair enough. But you describe frustration with links and auto-emails and other standard trappings of web commerce—most of which work as intended and as people like—as if these elements negate the availability of the real human beings that operate behind and alongside all that website-y stuff.

It might help if you had experience buying from services like stubhub or ticketmaster, where you literally can't find ANY means of contact with anyone within the company, to say nothing of direct emails and phone numbers to individual personal sales reps. In fact, that's quite rare across the entire realm of e-commerce, which is the foundation of the claim.

junior.thomas
Activity Score 27
CuriousPencil's picture

How can I put this more simply?

I had no expectations. I saw your ad, which starts "When you buy tickets at TicketCity you're being helped by a real human being."

I then expected a little more of that. A little more backup, a little less bullsh*t, a little more people, a little less same-old.

I'm not asking for any single thing more than your ad conditioned me to expect, really.

CuriousPencil
Activity Score 4225
Copywriter
dean viii's picture

lol. you guys are arguing about nonsense. who cares? you should be more concerned that there's absolutely no concept, that it's not funny and it's produced badly.

dean viii
Activity Score 1686
Creative Director
dean viii's picture

My eyes are burning!!!

dean viii
Activity Score 1686
Creative Director
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