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coffee machine ads

everartz's picture
everartz
Activity Score 7613

drunk dave...another two ads here!!

CheerzZz man..and everybody!

everartz

| everartz |

drunk dave's picture
drunk dave
Activity Score 1066

When made with christmas love, no two coffees are ever the same.

weighter's picture
weighter
Activity Score 744

Visuals are nice, but need something more. Its obvious you duplicated and rotated the cups as well because of the bubbles. The copy needs more attention, it could add another dimension but right now just sits there and adds nothing.

maybe add cream, marshmellows, chocolate shavings and other coffee sidekicks to make it more festive and extra depth?

weighter

everartz's picture
everartz
Activity Score 7613

yea your right dude...

any suggestions for copy???

everartz

| everartz |

weighter's picture
weighter
Activity Score 744

well you need to base copy on your strategy. Usually you have a creative brief to derive something pertinent from, but id guess you wanted to create a nice visual with this so you can decide what your own strategy is I guess. It give syou a starting point to begin brainstorming copy ideas...

Or you can take a simplistic approach, maybe just use the logo without the name, you can make a wordplay on the name... "Nespresso the season to be jolly" . theres a million possibilities im sure, but as it stands your current copy just indicates lack of effort/detail/idea I think.

ivan's picture
ivan

I agree with the above comments. Visuals are nice. Colors are nice. Copy needs a bit more work!

Guilherme Bill Luz's picture
Guilherme Bill Luz
Activity Score 202

why should I believe in the product? Why should i drink more coffee during the christmas time? maybe because is getting cold in europian countries....I saw visuals playing coffee many, many times and in different ways....

weighter's picture
weighter
Activity Score 744

Its valid to have no real selling point, if it conveys the proper emotion that extends/promotes or establishes their brand. So drinking more coffee isn't the absolute of this ad, warmth and such are valid directions though. happiness, joy, etc are all acceptable in the holidays season as well I would think.

weighter

thinkFRESHdesign's picture
thinkFRESHdesign
Activity Score 242

Yikes. Did you really just say that Weighter? "It's valid to have no real selling point"? Pssssst - come on over here. Go ahead...look at my product in this ad BUT please - don't buy it! It IS about product relevance and giving people a reason to buy. This ad uses a "moving relevance" (i.e. the christmas holidays) as the selling point.

So, what's MY reason to buy THIS product?

original doodles + creative sweat = thinkingfresh.ca

gulo's picture
gulo
Activity Score 461

chill...
there are brands and damn successful brands that dont put buying factors or USP's in their ads.
Amul India is one example.

thinkFRESHdesign's picture
thinkFRESHdesign
Activity Score 242

gulo - keep reading downwards

original doodles + creative sweat = thinkingfresh.ca

gulo's picture
gulo
Activity Score 461

whoa!! my bad.
this is a nice long path...
u right.
should read.

rikitiki's picture
rikitiki
Activity Score 630

hey thinkFRESH, you might want to listen to somebody who knows what they're talking about. I guarantee you Weighter knows what he's talking about.

It's no mistake that almost EVERY brand pays to do holiday/special occasion/theme ads. IT'S ALL ABOUT GETTING THE BRAND OUT THERE: PROMOTING AND EXTENDING THE BRAND RECOGNITION/IDENTITY.

SELLING can also take place in people recognizing and remembering the coffee maker, toothbrush, sofa, etc. without a specific selling point.

And yes, t is VERY productive to have a brand associated kindly with good cheer and a holiday mentality.

And it definitely doesn't hurt that on most holidays, people buy things.

thinkFRESHdesign's picture
thinkFRESHdesign
Activity Score 242

Look closer into this ad. It has more relevance than just "happiness" and "cheerfulness". Is it the "perfect gift for the holidays"? And if so, why? My argument was that it did have a valid selling point (whether intended or not). The ad defines what the holidays are about for many people: "a social experience" - through the use of multiple cups of brew.

As for "it's all about getting your brand out there"...awareness is not king. Awareness is irrelevant - so overcommunicate (in the art if you have to). Thanks for your quick lesson on brand recognition. But I was not arguing the relevancy of executing holiday ads - just the fact that the selling point of THIS ad was more than "just" the warmth and happiness of the holiday season.

original doodles + creative sweat = thinkingfresh.ca

weighter's picture
weighter
Activity Score 744

thinkFresh, your reply is quite confusing. Nowhere did I insenuate he should recommend consumers to NOT purchase the product...

fact of the matter is, consumers generally dislike being sold product in ads. Consumers remember emotion and feeling from ads significantly more effective than selling points. unique selling points in todays world market are rare anyways. If you build a brand, and can establish your charismatic brand as a #1 or #2 in the market then your branding efforts have paid off.

Brand advertising is investment into the future and market share of a company versus selling the item pictured in the ad itself.

Your response, if interpreted like it reads, is quite incorrect.

weighter

popdistortion's picture
popdistortion
Activity Score 1592

I have to agree with weighter and SOA. There is a pretty damn good book called 'Emotional Branding'. Basically something like a 'USP' does not really exist anymore. It's more like an 'Emotional Selling Proposition'. The problem is that products, of course there are exceptions, have become generic but do differ in the world they sell us. So, awareness is important, not everything. What you describe as your USP is emotional based. An emotion that Christmas has. That every product during Christmas has. You won't be selling a product, you will be raising awareness. Consequently, and hopefully, people will buy that product. But again, by no means, this USP, or ESP, is unique.

thinkFRESHdesign's picture
thinkFRESHdesign
Activity Score 242

Alright, let's put this to bed. Awareness (which is what "most" ads are designed to increase) doesn't get you sales. All it does is get you into the consideration set. And then you still have to sell. And print advertising that "only" seeks to entertain doesn't work. How can a "holiday" or a "product" have an emotion? That sounds ridiculous. But the holidays and certain "products" can inspire emotions during a certain sell time.

Agreed that people have an unlimitied number of products to choose from (as per your comment: "The problem is that products, of course there are exceptions, have become generic but do differ in the world they sell us.) BUT at the same time, people also have a limited amount of cashflow with which to purchase those same products. If you're talking brand differention in advertising here, good on you!

If consumers aren't buying the coffeemaker, what are they spending their money on? Could it be Starbucks? Doesn't Starbucks "also" offer a social experience for the consumer? And don't they "also" sell coffee-makers in each of their 5,000 or so locations?

The ad idea needs to be re-visited - keep in mind, it IS about product relevance to the consumer (more than simply product "awareness"). Does a coffee maker really make the perfect gift for the holidays? Why? Explain it...and make it relevant to the consumer who is in the consideration process of buying just ONE of many coffee makers out there.

PS - should your copy not read "Enjoy the taste of Christmas..."?

original doodles + creative sweat = thinkingfresh.ca

thinkFRESHdesign's picture
thinkFRESHdesign
Activity Score 242

original doodles + creative sweat = thinkingfresh.ca

thinkFRESHdesign's picture
thinkFRESHdesign
Activity Score 242

Debate me all you'd like Weighter. Somewhere you DID insinuate that the ad had "no real selling point..." which DOES in fact mean "What's the point of buying it"?

Not all consumers are stupid. We (meaning me, you, and the masses) KNOW that ads are supposed to be selling the product, as opposed to merely "entertaining" us. Good advertising can execute the sell in such a way that with a little "extra" thought (above & beyond the entertainment value of the ad) we'll be able to see the selling point very clearly (and not just be aware that there's a product in front of our faces).

All ads should (and in this particular case...does) have a selling point (albeit a harder one to see in this ad than most). Good luck if you're priority is to establish your "brand" as #1 or #2 in the "market". Whose "market"? Have you possibly thought that the main competitor for this coffee maker probably isn't even a company whose main selling product is a coffeemaker? (think Grande Triple-Shot Latte here). It's not always about establishing your brand as #1 (or #2) to get the lead. Being able to establish with consumers WHY it's better to buy a coffee-maker versus a Tall Double-Shot Americano would be a better definition of "market share" (through product differentiation no less)

Clearly BRANDING (which is way more then *just* advertising, by the way) is an investment in the future of any product or company. How sure are you that you know what a "brand" or "branding" really is?

original doodles + creative sweat = thinkingfresh.ca

weighter's picture
weighter
Activity Score 744

A companies brand isnt a logo, it isnt what you say it is, it isnt what I say it is. A brand can only truely be measured by gathering a consensus of opinions on what said company are to all... when you get a similiar answer from the majority of the group, you then have a grip on what the brand means. A brand isnt completely tangible, and the ideal goal of most companies would be to establish what is termed a 'charismatic brand'.

Marty Neumeier states that companies which stretch their brand for the purpose of direct sales and expansions, in fact are doing so in detriment to their brand and ultimately market-share. He quotes a couple cases and provides a very compelling argument in his book 'Bridging the Brand Gap'. Its an AWESOME book, and I would recommend it to yourself as you seem to have a little confusion as to what a Brand and Branding through advertising actually is.

Advertising campaigns in todays age primarily focuses on whats referred to U.E.P. (unique emotional proposition) and has long since departed the U.S.P. (unique selling point). USP is a weak startegy simply because you are investing into promoting something that other products have or can easily duplicate. Investing into how people percieve and accept you is large business. How would Coke and Pepsi manage to gain a 'charismatic brand' if they simply competed against each other in their advertising efforts.

Brand is completely independant of selling propositions.

If you disagree then Im afraid we will have to agree to disagree on this subject and leave it at that.

Cheers
weighter

thinkFRESHdesign's picture
thinkFRESHdesign
Activity Score 242

Great. You read books. Can you read my posts? I did not make mention anywhere that a "brand" was just simply a "logo". It looks like you're starting to "set-up" arguments for the sake of arguing. A brand, weighter - is an experience. Clearly it's nothing tangible (as you stated correctley) - but to imply that a company can only establish what the essence of their "brand" is from a consensus made up by a group of "people" is utterly tiring. Who determines the essence of a brand? The company or the consumer? I hope you said company, because if you said consumer - Coke may as well promote the next person who buys a can of their product to Chief Executive Officer.

A brand is an experience - and therefore, it's a company's greatest advantage (or weapon) in the "on-going and continous" battle for market share. Branding is HUGELY beneficial - it allows you to "direct" consumers to your "product" through your branding strategy. YOU choose how consumers will "interact" with your product, your employees, your company - thus, YOUR BRAND. It's a "package" or container for a consumer's total experience with a product (or service). Why are you relating the positioning strategies of the Coca-Cola and Pepsi brands to this coffee maker ad? I don't see the relevance in your arguement.

Coca-Cola vs. Pepsi? Just what is it that you think they're doing in their advertising? Promoting each other's products? Clearly they're "competing" against one other. Are you REALLY putting forth that these two companies are only advertising their brands so that they will eventually become - or maintain their status as "charismatic". Remember the "Pepsi Challenge"? Or Coca-Cola's "The Real Thing" slogan? What do you think those campaigns were doing? They were differentiating Pepsi from Coke AND Coke from Pepsi.

So yes - these two soda-pop giants are Numbers 1 and 2 (respectively) in the "soda-pop" market segment - clearly they've spent alot of energy (and time, and money) to differentiate their products from each other's. Maybe at one time Coca-Cola was only interested in creating a "brand charisma" for their coke product - but you can bet your ass it was BEFORE Pepsi showed up and STOLE a huge percentage of Coke's market share right out from under their noses. Maybe some research on the history of these 2 soda-pop companies (and the strategies they've used to position their brands) is in order - before you use them as your first example.

Brand is NOT completely independant of selling propositions: Brand(ing) is a PART of selling propositions. Why pay a premium for a product that doesn't offer any particular value or difference? Why do people pay $2.50 for a cup of coffee at Starbucks when they could get a coffee for .75¢ at 7-Eleven? Why should I pay $80 for a Nespresso Coffee Maker when I can get a generic one at Wal-Mart for $19.99? It is about brand relevance to the consumer. Period. It's not about YOUR creativty in the ad. It's about YOUR clients ability to sell their product through your creativty AND their selling points. Still convinced that it's NOT ok to have no "real selling point" in an ad?

Show me a coffee maker in an ad. Or a cute design with coffee cups. But if you can't explain to me (or Grandma, or Aunt Darla, or my girfriend, etc.) why it's relevant to purchase the coffee maker in the ad, than you are only creating awareness. Ok - so, you're showing me your product - keeping me "aware" that your brand's product is still there - waiting to be chosen for purchase. A product for me to "consider".

I'll enjoy looking at that ad while I sip coffee brewed in my $19.99 Wal-Mart machine. And maybe I'll come across a different ad "telling" me how to use up the $60 that I didn't spend on your coffee maker (because your ad never told me to buy it - it just made aware it was there). AWARENESS DOES NOT SELL.

original doodles + creative sweat = thinkingfresh.ca

weighter's picture
weighter
Activity Score 744

Comprehension is important. Your rant while riddled with very effective usage of the caps key, again is off the mark. I have a sneaking suspicion that you enjoy a debate more than anything.

A brand is a consumer experience and impression, while this indeed created and directed by the company and their advertising, it is truely a consumer driven entity. Otherwise, according to yourself, everyones brand is exactly what the marketing and advertising execs say it is. Please dont repeat what I say again changing words and adding caps to somehow believe you have changed my argument this time ok?

We are done on this subject. it is impossible to have a sensible discussion as far as I can see here.

THANK you for YOUR time and KEEP thinking FRESH dude!

thinkFRESHdesign's picture
thinkFRESHdesign
Activity Score 242

Too exasperating. You're not attacking the content - but instead my use of the CAPS key? Weak. Very weak. As for your comment "A brand is a consumer experience and impression" - is this not exactly what I have been saying all along (almost verbatim)?

But your suggestion (from whatever book you read and than re-read) that the essence of a brand experience is "only" determined by the consumer - that's a little bit out-to-lunch. You decide where your brand will go. So, do you sometimes base your positioning strategies on data provided to you via consumer reporting groups? Yep. But not always. And at the end of the day - it's still your product, and your job to direct consumers (first-time users and loyalists and ever other type in between) back to your product - through the branding experience. And the experience (the way in which your consumers interact with your product) is what YOU create.

And now I too am done on this subject. Thanks for the banter weighter. As for anyone else who takes the time to read our posts (brevity has never been one of my best traits) - I hope you'll now have a better understanding of why it's so damned important to make your products relevant to the consumer.

original doodles + creative sweat = thinkingfresh.ca

everartz's picture
everartz
Activity Score 7613

wow guys!!!! lots of comments here... thanks guys, and thank you weighter for the suggestions..accually everybody too...
i'll take in consideration what you said and work it out properly...

cheerzZz all
everartz

| everartz |

salamandos's picture
salamandos
Activity Score 1947

This is lame as there exist tons of ads with products forming a symbol.

thinkFRESHdesign's picture
thinkFRESHdesign
Activity Score 242

HUH?

original doodles + creative sweat = thinkingfresh.ca

adabortion's picture
adabortion
Activity Score 615

Let's help the guy, not just criticize him. In my view, work harder on the copy and YOU'LL GET THERE Everartz.

thinkFRESHdesign's picture
thinkFRESHdesign
Activity Score 242

Ok everartz - here's a new ad idea for this product. Suggestion only (wish I had the time and the art skills necessary to execute this one).

2 hands wrapped around a steaming mug of black coffee, and your Point of View is looking out of an open door into the frosty cold night. In front of those 2 hands and that warm cup of coffee is a group of christmas carolers, all holding those disposable to-go cups (with a barely visible Starbucks logo on the cups?). The carolers' mouths are open as if they were singing. Icicles hang precaroisuly from the tips of their noses and their faces are frosted over. Clearly they're frozen. And thanks to your Nespresso Coffee Maker, you're not.

original doodles + creative sweat = thinkingfresh.ca

adabortion's picture
adabortion
Activity Score 615

Now is that a TVC you're talking about, Thinkfreshdesign?

adabortion's picture
adabortion
Activity Score 615

Now is that a TVC you're talking about, Thinkfreshdesign?

thinkFRESHdesign's picture
thinkFRESHdesign
Activity Score 242

Not an ad for TV. Can be designed as a print ad. Product (coffee maker) could be displayed in the bottom corner of the ad (as in the copy already posted). No text in the ad copy (besides the Brand Name/Logo beside product). And forget about the silly sentence i.e. "Clearly they're frozen and you're not..." that was just meant to explain the idea to whoever takes it to the next level.

original doodles + creative sweat = thinkingfresh.ca

everartz's picture
everartz
Activity Score 7613

thank you thinkFRESHdesign, and everyone else...

everartz...

| everartz |

Guilherme Bill Luz's picture
Guilherme Bill Luz
Activity Score 202

Great STUFF!!!

buy by bye's picture
buy by bye
Activity Score 534

i hate ads with products forming a symbol!
lazy and boring

next'

mauroxxx's picture
mauroxxx
Activity Score 539

Good idea...just one advise, dont use the same cup of coffee for all, try to use at least 2 or 3 different pictures.

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